The ‘king of porn’ plans to remove Donald Trump from the presidency?!

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It's an entire page ad in The Washington Post this Sunday. There are two phrases in huge capital letters that stand out: $ 10 million and Donald J. Trump. Proponents Larry Flynt and pornographic magazine Hustler, of which he is founder, offer that "cash offer" in exchange for "information leading to the impeachment and recall" of the current US president. The ad details a phone number and an email to write to. The information, they emphasize, will remain "confidential".

Speculation over an impeachment over Trump overturns Washington over the revelations of its ties to Russia for months, but it seems an unlikely scenario as Republicans control Congress and for now there is no evidence of irregularity. There is one key man in that debate: Robert Mueller. The special prosecutor investigating the Russian plot is the one to determine if Trump could commit a crime of obstruction of justice by dismissing James Comey as director of the FBI, who led the polls on the ties of the president's environment with Moscow. Mueller also has to clarify whether the Republican could coordinate with Russian interference in the election campaign, but is still in the initial phase of his polls.

The advertising strategy of Flynt, founder of Hustler and producer of pornographic films since 1998, is not so surprising. The publisher, who backed Democrat Hillary Clinton in the 2016 elections, already published an ad in the Post in 2007 asking for information about people who had had an inappropriate sexual encounter with a congressman or member of the government. In 1998 he published a very similar announcement and is speculated that led to the resignation of Republican Congressman Bob Livingston, who aspired to reach the top of Congress.

In the announcement about Trump, Flynt analyzes a trail of alleged irregularities during the election and puts forward several reasons why he believes the current president is a danger to the US. "There is strong evidence that the last election was illegitimate in many ways and that after nine tumultuous months in office Trump has proven to be dangerously inept," he writes. He recalled that Trump did not win the popular vote, but in translating votes according to the demographic weight of each state, and claims that he could have benefited from the redesign of electoral districts, voter suppression laws and presumed Russian interference to help him win the election by spreading compromising information about Clinton.

The possibility of impeachment to a president, vice president and any civil public office is enshrined in the US Constitution. But its interpretation is wide: it can be propelled before what are considered cases of "betrayal, bribery, high crimes or faults". And a significant consensus is needed: the House of Representatives must pass by a majority the dismissal and the Senate to back it with the support of two-thirds of the full.

There have only been two impeachment proceedings against a US president. Both were Democrats and the vote did not advance in the Senate: in 1868 to Andrew Johnson and in 1998 to Bill Clinton. In 1974, Congress was beginning preparations to try to oust President Richard Nixon when the Republican resigned over the Watergate scandal.

In his announcement, Flynt argues that there are six legal grounds that could lead to the presentation of an impeachment against Trump: coordinating with "a hostile foreign power", alluding to Russia, and obstructing justice with Comey's dismissal; encourage violent "conflict" with their advocacy of racist groups; conflicts of interest for the business empire of the president; say "hundreds" of lies; "Nepotism" and designation of persons not qualified for official positions; and "sabotage" the Paris Agreement on Climate Change.

The announcement concludes: "I think it's my patriotic duty and that of all Americans."

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